Telephone : 01633 744144

Architects Registration BoardRIBA

RIBA Chartered


Special Offers

  • 1 Hrs Free Consultation with Chartered Practice Architect

Practice Areas

  • Education
    Carrying out design work for Crèche Facilities, Schools, Colleges or simply carry out extension works any of these type of buildings.
  • Residential
    Specializing in the design of Extensions, New Builds, Extra Care Homes and Housing Layout Sites.
  • Office
    New Build, Refurbishment or Extension of Offices and some Retail experience with Restaurant/Estate Agent Design.
  • Leisure
    We are working on numerous Rugby Clubs and an Events Centre in England. We cover all aspects of Leisure including sports facilities, events buildings, village community hall/buildings and numerous others .
  • Research
    Currently working on Flood Risk within buildings. Please email for further details.

planning permission

TOP TIPS FOR CHOOSING AN ARCHITECT

top-tips-for-choosing-an-architect 

There are a number of ways a person may seek to find an architect – most commonly through word of mouth referrals, via search engine sites or by asking on social media for recommendations. If using the latter how do you know which firms are competent and reliable to do the work you need, in the way you imagined? 

 

Our top tips for choosing an architect!

- The first necessary step is to check they are registered with the ARB. (Architects Registration Board). The ARB was set up by the government to keep an official register of all individuals and practices who are legally entitled and qualified to use the patented term ‘architect’. You can check the architects register here – http://architects-register.org.uk/

- Whilst not a necessity we strongly advise using a RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects) Chartered Practice. (Click here to read why you should a choose a RIBA Chartered practice.)

- Thinking about your project do you need a specific skillset or service? For example, if you are working on change of use scheme it would be beneficial to choose a practice which can demonstrate experience within that sector. We recommend asking how many projects of that type the practice has worked upon, if there are any finished buildings you can visit or if they can supply a contact for testimonial.

- Put together a shortlist of architects to speak to in person about your plans. Most firms will offer a free consultation or initial discussion. This is a great opportunity for architects to demonstrate their creative ideas and   general enthusiasm for your project.

- Ask the practice for their track record with approvals – try and suss out if they have a good relationship with local planners.

- The fee proposal – don’t necessarily go for the cheapest bid. Weigh up everything you have learnt about your potential architect so far. A good practice will always devote time to explaining their fee proposal and         clarifying any points you may be unsure of.

 

Want to read more like this? Delve into our previous blog topics –

How to brief your architect 

Our guide to extensions – Part one

Will my build need planning permission?

 

 We would love to discuss your plans and ideas, contact the team today on 01633 744144 to arrange your free one hour consultation!

Our Guide to Extensions – Part One

Our Guide to ExtensionsPart One

As we are heading into winter it is the perfect time to start planning and designing your project ready for building work to commence in the spring and summer. We have complied a series of blog posts to equip and support you with as much information as possible through this process as part of our #designinwinterbuildinsppring campaign. Enjoy part one of our latest read, explaining why extensions are not as simple as you may think…

 

We are often approached by clients looking to maximise the space in their property through the addition of an extension. Whilst it may sound simple enough, there are many important considerations to be made when joining a new structure to an existing one and it isn’t always an easy process when each project is different with a unique set of challenges.

 

Architects need to determine how a potential extension might impact upon what is already existing at the property, even if it is not always immediately visible. Drainage is a prime example of this – architects need to check the position of drains, if they are private or shared, they will also look to see if there is a need to contact the water board for a build over sewer agreement.

 

There are other types of considerations to be made also. For example, will a potential extension be a concern for neighbouring buildings? Will the extension obscure the view for next door? Will the proposed window placements be a cause for complaint? If the extension is to be built astride a boundary wall then a party wall agreement will need to be in place.

 

Architects will also think about how the local planning office may respond if the proposed works extend beyond permitted rights development, they will also be checking if there are certain legal permissions that need to be adhered to. Whenever there is a modification to an existing building, then there is a need to apply for building regulations in order to obtain Building Control approval. This means submitting a set of drawings to the local authority and having on-site inspections by the Building Control Officer during the build.

 

Is the site within a conservation area or an area of ecological interest? If the development is within a conservation area then the planning application will need to be assessed by Conservation Officers as well as going through the usual local authority procedures, where a Design and Access statement explaining the designer's intended design ethos needs to be submitted also.

 

Are there physical concerns with the build? Will certain materials need to be used or avoided? How will the new structure attach to the old building in a way that will ensure it is watertight, insulated and sound proofed?

 

These are just a few examples in which an architect may need to examine, plan and research in detail prior to the fun part of actually designing your build. Your architect will be able to advise you of the individual concerns for your property at initial visits and solutions for how they will overcome these obstacles.

 

Once architects physically find a way to connect the new to the old, whilst designing a structure that both addresses potential challenges and at the same time satisfying the client’s design brief, they then need to be able to communicate all this information across to the contracted builders.

 

So as you can see there is a vast amount of work that goes in behind the scenes before a builder even steps foot on site. Our very own practice has great experience with extensions for both residential and commercial schemes and we currently offer a free 1 hour consultation to discuss new projects.

 

Part two of this post, will showcase a recently completed residential extension from the design brief right through to the completed home. It is a great opportunity to become familiarised with the stages of work involved, get an idea of how we looked to overcome the challenges for this particular scheme and see through a series of photographs how our client’s ideas are refined and brought to life. We also have a testimonial from our client explaining how she found the process of working with us. Packed full of top tips and advice it is not to be missed.

 

You can keep up to date of our latest news and blogs here and please feel free to contact the team on 01633 744144 to discuss your own project.

 

Will my build need planning permission?

will_my_build_need_planning_permission_jpg

There are a few questions that architect practices get asked on a regular basis. So to help our clients become better informed we’ve decided to talk about our most frequently asked questions, starting with the most common; ‘Will my build need planning permission?’

 

Every project undertaken by ourselves is assessed on an individual basis as to whether or not planning permission is required and it is something we can advise further in our initial consultation, but here’s some information to help gauge whether your project is likely to require planning or not.

 

What is planning permission and when might you need it?

In simple terms, planning permission is a request (usually to your local planning office) to carry out a specific type of building work. It ideally needs to be granted before any work begins. So whether you are thinking of adding an extension to an existing home, creating a build from scratch or maybe even looking to change the use of your building, you may require planning permission.

However you can also perform certain types of work without the need to apply for planning at all, as these fall under the category of ‘permitted development rights.’

Permitted development rights, derive from a general planning permission issued by the government and can be more restrictive in designated areas of the country – For example, if your project resided in a national park.

(It is important to stress that permitted development rights, differ between commercial, and residential properties. With differences between domestic homes such as houses and apartments again. So it is especially important to seek expert advice prior to starting a build).

 

Where to find out more?

With so many different factors it can be tricky to know where to start finding out the correct information for your build.

To investigate the particular planning constraints for your project we recommend the following;

 

Speak to your local planning department - The government have given the main responsibility of planning to local council authorities, if you have a specific question regarding your proposal your local planning dept. should be able to help answer it.

 

Look online – There are several reliable online resources you can turn to in order to find out more information regarding planning; most notably planningportal.co.uk. Here you can find comprehensive information (including several interactive guides) relating to the planning constraints of properties in Wales (as well as England).  

planning_portal_2 planning_portal_1

You can also review documents on the Welsh Government’s planning policy by clicking the link below;

http://gov.wales/topics/planning/policy/ppw/?lang=en

 

Chat with us – You can always utilise our team’s knowledge. As experts in our field and thoroughly up to date with local planning we will happily talk you through your proposal. Call us today on 01633 744144.